MIT OpenCourseWare | Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences | 12.090 Special Topics: An Introduction to Fluid Motions, Sediment Transport, and Current-generated Sedimentary Structures, Fall 2006 | Home

MIT OpenCourseWare | Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences | 12.090 Special Topics: An Introduction to Fluid Motions, Sediment Transport, and Current-generated Sedimentary Structures, Fall 2006 | Home.

 

One of the best courses I ever read. I wish to see it updated. If we donate, does MIT promise to update this course?

 

Special thanks for the poetic parts like this:

Or you are standing at the kitchen sink, washing root vegetables fresh from the garden. The fine fraction of the loosened sediment is carried in suspension down the drain, never to be seen again, but the coarser fraction is immediately formed into small- scale streaks on the surface of the sink, beneath the fast-flowing water headed for the drain. Go back to the final section in Chapter 4, on coherent structures in turbulent flow, for the dynamics behind these bed-load streaks.

 

 

want to know your real citation index – use Google Scholar

turbulent OR suspension AND author:”A Liberzon” – Google Scholar.

 

Using Web of Science, I get about 170 citations for 29 publications. That’s fine, but for example few very important works that I was lucky to be involved were published only in Conference Proceedings or all kind of publication series, e.g. Advances in Turbulence which is in fact proceedings of the European Turbulence Conference. In any case, real impact is provided by Google Scholar.

For example:

 

http://scholar.google.co.il/scholar?hl=en&num=100&q=%28turbulent+OR+suspension%29+AND+author%3A%22A+Liberzon%22&btnG=Search&as_allsubj=some&as_subj=eng&as_subj=phy&as_sdt=1%2C5&as_ylo=1999&as_yhi=2011&as_vis=0

 

I also recommend using Firefox extension for h-index – gives a lot of useful information.

 

 

When Scientists Sin: Scientific American

In his 1974 commencement speech at the California Institute of Technology, Nobel laureate physicist Richard P. Feynman articulated the foundation of scientific integrity: “The first principle is that you must not fool yourself—and you are the easiest person to fool…. After you’ve not fooled yourself, it’s easy not to fool other scientists. You just have to be honest in a conventional way after that.”

via When Scientists Sin: Scientific American.