MIT OpenCourseWare | Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences | 12.090 Special Topics: An Introduction to Fluid Motions, Sediment Transport, and Current-generated Sedimentary Structures, Fall 2006 | Home

MIT OpenCourseWare | Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences | 12.090 Special Topics: An Introduction to Fluid Motions, Sediment Transport, and Current-generated Sedimentary Structures, Fall 2006 | Home.

 

One of the best courses I ever read. I wish to see it updated. If we donate, does MIT promise to update this course?

 

Special thanks for the poetic parts like this:

Or you are standing at the kitchen sink, washing root vegetables fresh from the garden. The fine fraction of the loosened sediment is carried in suspension down the drain, never to be seen again, but the coarser fraction is immediately formed into small- scale streaks on the surface of the sink, beneath the fast-flowing water headed for the drain. Go back to the final section in Chapter 4, on coherent structures in turbulent flow, for the dynamics behind these bed-load streaks.

 

 

Weather in a Tank

I really like the idea of adding experiments as the curriculum tool – we will have by far more students in our field of experimental fluid mechanics.

A curriculum built around a rotating-tank experiment could improve weather and climate education

In recent years, U.S. undergraduates have shown an increasing interest in introductory meteorology, oceanography and climate classes. But many students find it difficult to grasp the non-intuitive nature of rotating fluids, which is critical to understanding how weather systems and climate work. Part of the problem, it turns out, is that instructors usually have to teach these abstract concepts using only equations or computer simulations because of the limited resources available for lab experiments.

Read more on MIT News blog: http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2010/weather-tank-0317.html