How maths can make you rich and famous by Chris Budd

http://plus.maths.org/issue25/features/budd/

Chris Budd writes in +plus magazine click here for the plus home page

The article I chose to cite is about … of course – Navier Stokes and the Clay Institute 6th Millenium Prize Problem. So, if we talk in pictures, than:

the aftermath of a hurricane
They didn’t see this coming.
The aftermath of a hurricane in North Carolina.
Photo copyright FEMA

Fluid mechanics with biscuits on the side. <br> <font size=-1>Image <a href=

Fluid mechanics with biscuits on the side.
Image DHD Photo Gallery

The red spot on the surface of Jupiter is a storm that has been raging for more than 300 years.  <br><font size=-1>Composite image courtesy of <a href=

The red spot on the surface of Jupiter is a storm that has been raging for more than 300 years.
Composite image courtesy of NASA

Thrust SSC

The Thrust SuperSonic Car breaking the sound barrier in Blackrock Desert,
Nevada on 15th October 1997. Picture copyright Andy Graves

From the mathematical point of view, the questions is:

All of the above issues are very important to the way that we use the Navier-Stokes equations to help us to understand the physical world around us, but they pale into insignificance when compared to the subject of the sixth Millennium Prize Problem. This is not whether we can solve the Navier-Stokes equations (either exactly or using a computer), but whether they have any solutions at all.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s